Night Trap


CategorĂ­a(s): PelĂ­cula interactiva
Description

Night Trap is an interactive movie video game developed by Digital Pictures for the Sega/Mega-CD and first released in North America on October 15, 1992. It was later ported to the Sega 32X, 3DO, MS-DOS, and Mac OS. The game is composed of over 90 minutes of full-motion video (FMV) sequences, only possible with the storage capabilities of the new CD-ROM format. The plot concerns a group of young women who are the targets of the Augers, vampiric beings who wish to take the women's blood. The player must switch between various hidden cameras, activating traps that capture the Augers and prevent the women from being harmed.

Night Trap is notorious for the controversy it brewed in 1993 due to the game's mature content. This controversy led to withdrawal of the game from the market, hearings on violent video games at the United States Senate, and contributed to the creation of the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB). Night Trap was given a 15 certificate by the British Board of Film Classification.

A group of young women are staying at Mr. and Mrs. Martin's house for the night. The Martin family seems like a normal American family; however, odd things have been occurring at this house. Five girls who previously stayed there had disappeared, so the "Sega Control Attack Team" ("Sega" changed to "Special" once the game was ported to other consoles) is called upon to protect the new guests and find out what happened. As the new wave of girls arrive for a slumber party (one of whom is undercover SCAT agent Kelly (or Kelli) Medd,[a] played by Dana Plato), the vampiric Augers begin to invade the Martin family house, and it's up to the player to save the girls.

The game is an example of the trap-em-up genre,[citation needed] which also includes games like Heiankyo Alien, Space Panic, and Lode Runner. Referred to as "control", the player views events via hidden cameras set up in eight different locations, which can be viewed one at a time. As the aforementioned Augers creep into the house, the player has to spot them and use traps to capture them. At the bottom of a screen rests a small meter; when this meter fills, it is the player's signal to activate a trap in the room being viewed (i.e. a revolving bookcase or a faux seal on the floor) and capture the Auger(s) on screen, adding to the score.

The player must also have the correct security access color code selected on screen in order for the traps to work. The code is changed four times throughout the course of the game, and keeping up with the accurate code requires listening in on key conversations. Ultimately, high performance requires repeat plays in order to gain complete knowledge of the story and capture all Augers possible. Time always moves forward, cannot be rewound, and if too many vampires are missed, the game ends. The game will also end if certain characters are taken away or if the hosts of the slumber party disconnect the player's access to the traps.